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Huge interest in Rotary Community Bandstand

Luton North_bandstand_wide_angle_pic_of_audience_900On Rotary Day, February 23rd., the first landmark of the Bandstand project was reached. The Public Launch, organised by Luton Someries Rotary Club, was held at the Pavilion in the presence of 60 or so invited guests, the Presidents of the four Luton Rotary Clubs, and Rotarians from their clubs. After a reception, Alan Corkhill, Chairman of the Bandstand Steering Committee, gave a very clear and concise presentation covering the project, an outline of the design competition for the youth of Luton and the role of Rotary and the Youth Trust, and answered a number of pertinent questions from the audience. The message of intent was very clear:

A Bandstand will be built on, or close to, the site of the original Bandstand in Wardown Park. It will be “fit-for-purpose in this, the 21st Century. It will be a community resource, available all the year round to every section of the community, and which can be enjoyed by all free of charge.

Luton North_Typical_Community_BandstandThere will be a design competition backed by the University of Bedfordshire, Barnfield College and the Luton Sixth Form College, with significant prizes in kind for the winners and the school or college they attend. Parameters for the competition are presently being determined by Luton Rotary Club, in conjunction with the colleges, and will be available shortly. Recognition of the winners and elements of the winning design will be incorporated in the final building.

There will be a ‘commercial’ launch to industry and local businesses, to encourage them to become involved as sponsors and contributors to the cost, is being arranged shortly.  Firms contributing will be suitably acknowledged in the building. There will be an opportunity for all local organisations and individuals to contribute and become a part of the project.

Charity status for the project is being sought, and is expected shortly. A pre-planning application has been submitted, and Council Leader Hazel Simmons commented that Luton Borough Council would work with Rotary to complete the project. An achievable target date is Summer 2015

The proposals were enthusiastically received, and there was a real buzz of excitement in the room. During the tea, that followed there was a rolling presentation on the screen, created by Tony Musgrove, that illustrated a number of styles of bandstand. He also gave information about Rotary and the Youth Trust.  Printed information was available around the room and individual Rotarians were available to answer questions.

Leslie Robertson
Rotary Club of Luton North

Photographs: Rotary Bandstand public launch and a typical Community Bandstand

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