Newsletter signup form

 

* Indicates required
 

Huge interest in Rotary Community Bandstand

Luton North_bandstand_wide_angle_pic_of_audience_900On Rotary Day, February 23rd., the first landmark of the Bandstand project was reached. The Public Launch, organised by Luton Someries Rotary Club, was held at the Pavilion in the presence of 60 or so invited guests, the Presidents of the four Luton Rotary Clubs, and Rotarians from their clubs. After a reception, Alan Corkhill, Chairman of the Bandstand Steering Committee, gave a very clear and concise presentation covering the project, an outline of the design competition for the youth of Luton and the role of Rotary and the Youth Trust, and answered a number of pertinent questions from the audience. The message of intent was very clear:

A Bandstand will be built on, or close to, the site of the original Bandstand in Wardown Park. It will be “fit-for-purpose in this, the 21st Century. It will be a community resource, available all the year round to every section of the community, and which can be enjoyed by all free of charge.

Luton North_Typical_Community_BandstandThere will be a design competition backed by the University of Bedfordshire, Barnfield College and the Luton Sixth Form College, with significant prizes in kind for the winners and the school or college they attend. Parameters for the competition are presently being determined by Luton Rotary Club, in conjunction with the colleges, and will be available shortly. Recognition of the winners and elements of the winning design will be incorporated in the final building.

There will be a ‘commercial’ launch to industry and local businesses, to encourage them to become involved as sponsors and contributors to the cost, is being arranged shortly.  Firms contributing will be suitably acknowledged in the building. There will be an opportunity for all local organisations and individuals to contribute and become a part of the project.

Charity status for the project is being sought, and is expected shortly. A pre-planning application has been submitted, and Council Leader Hazel Simmons commented that Luton Borough Council would work with Rotary to complete the project. An achievable target date is Summer 2015

The proposals were enthusiastically received, and there was a real buzz of excitement in the room. During the tea, that followed there was a rolling presentation on the screen, created by Tony Musgrove, that illustrated a number of styles of bandstand. He also gave information about Rotary and the Youth Trust.  Printed information was available around the room and individual Rotarians were available to answer questions.

Leslie Robertson
Rotary Club of Luton North

Photographs: Rotary Bandstand public launch and a typical Community Bandstand

Twitter

Rotary News

Rotary International News

  • The recent Ebola outbreak in West Africa, the worst ever, has claimed several thousand lives and generated worldwide concern. But its impact pales in comparison to that of AIDS, which, despite advances in treatment, still kills more than a million people a year, the majority of them in Africa. "Even with the Ebola outbreak at its worst expected levels, it's never going to reach what we've seen with the HIV/AIDS epidemic," said Dr. Timothy B. Erickson, director of the Center for Global Health at the University of Illinois at Chicago, speaking at Rotary's World AIDS Day event in Evanston on 1...

  • Rotary International condemns the horrific attack that killed more than 130 schoolchildren and wounded over 100 of their classmates in Peshawar, Pakistan. We believe that children everywhere have the basic right to receive an education in an environment unthreatened by violence or fear. Rotary extends our heartfelt sympathy to all of the families in Pakistan, including those of seven Rotary members, who have lost children as a result of this unfathomable tragedy. We stand with them in mourning their loss. Gary C.K. Huang, PresidentRotary International

  • After decades dreaming about the Himalayas, Rotary member George Basch went on his first trek through the mountains in 2001, when he was 64. A member of the Rotary Club of Taos-Melagro in New Mexico, USA, Basch found that the experience was even more than he had hoped. "My expectations were high, and dramatically exceeded," he remembers. But a less-than-pleasant aspect of the experience was the indoor smoke pollution he encountered in the guest houses and private homes he visited. Many families in the Himalayas use rudimentary cookstoves or, in some cases, an open fire pit inside the home to...

Facebook

by asfaleies autokiniton